The Unicorn Coin

As it turned out, March was crazy even for my normal level of crazy, and I was unable to get a 5150: Hard Currency game in during the whole month. I’d like to get caught up but one thing that did happen was the D&D campaign I’ve been running got restarted and in recognition of that I have started printing props for the game. That way, when the players find a magic item, I may be able to hand them a replica of the item to have on hand. The designs come from Props and Beyond, which has a subscription service where each month they send you more magic item options that a reasonable person can complete.

The first item I’ve printed and painted is “The Unicorn Coin” which, according to the description that comes with the file, allows the person who is attuned to the coin and three other willing people to teleport to the coin’s location, with a maximum range of one mile.

Now it is obvious that this is essentially the D&D version of the “smoke bomb” for the players, because I could see a person socking the coin away somewhere outside a dungeon, getting into big trouble, and then teleporting out. But that presumption is built around the idea that there are four people in the gaming party, which is WotC’s built-in assumption in regards to their rules, but isn’t the case in a lot of groups, including mine. Often we have five, or even six players. So do I tweak the description of the item to allow larger groups to escape, or do I force the group to choose which four (or fewer) flee the dungeon? The former seems the most “player friendly” option, but the latter has interesting roleplaying/decision making aspects to it.

What do you think it should be? Answers in the comments.

One comment

  1. The hilarity of forcing players to play favorites is something to witness. Also by the time PC’s are pulling the coin you probably have at least one or two down. Is it a convenience item or a true code brown in the pants moment?

    You can also get into rescues and hostage ransoms if some are left behind…

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